Chronic, longstanding pain can be an extremely distressing experience and often requires specialist understanding and knowledge to address effectively. As pain persists, the body adapts accordingly, which can lead to ongoing pain and disability despite resolution of the underlying physical injury/trauma. In more significant cases this can result in neurological sensitisation, altered movement patterns, fear/avoidance behaviours, mood changes (depression, anxiety), and poor sleep. These factors can work in a negative feedback loop resulting in a steady decline in function and increase in pain.

Our specially trained therapists will work with you to find the best possible pathway to recovery and help you return to the activities and life you value.

Chronic Regional Pain (CRPS)

CRPS presents as persistent, ongoing pain around the hand/wrist or the ankle and foot after an injury. It can present with any or all of the following- Skin discolouration, high sensitivity to touch and movement, temperature changes, unusual or excessive hair growth, burning, pins + needles, swelling, altered movement (sometimes partial or complete paralysis).

Chronic Lower Back Pain

Persistent, ongoing lower back pain is surprisingly common and can arise with or without a trauma to the region. It can have a wide range of contributing factors that need to be addressed including physical factors (posture, strength, flexibility) as well as psychological and environmental factors (stress, distress, poor sleep, mood disorders, and many others). Understanding how these contribute to your lower back pain can help to alleviate worry and enable the development of an effective, individualised approach to each person’s issue.

Persistent Neck Pain

Persistent, ongoing lower back pain is surprisingly common and can arise with or without a trauma to the region. It can have a wide range of contributing factors that need to be addressed including physical factors (posture, strength, flexibility, type of work requirements) as well as psychological and environmental factors (stress, distress, poor sleep, mood disorders, and many others). Understanding how these contribute to your lower back pain can help to alleviate worry and enable the development of an effective, individualised approach to each person’s issue.

Arthritic Conditions

Osteoarthritis and Rheaumatoid Arthritis can occur at any age, but are more common as we age. Often people feel that rest is the best option as this is often less painful in the short-term, however it is well proven that exercise to regain or maintain strength and flexibility provides much better medium to long-term outcomes. We can provide assistance with both hands-on techniques (massage and manual therapy) and developing an individualised exercise program to target the area of concern.

Migraines & Headaches

Migraines and headaches have multiple contributing factors and are best treated with the development of an individualised treatment approach based on a thorough assessment. Best results are achieved when biomechanical factors such as muscle tightness, joint stiffness, and postural issues are understood and treated alongside other triggers such as stress, mood disorders, poor sleep, and anxiety.

Whiplash

Whiplash is sustained due to forceful, rapid back-and-forth movement of the neck, commonly associated with car accidents. Most often there is no discernable “injury” with Xrays and MRI scans revealing no clear trauma. However, the pain persists for long periods of time and often results in long standing issues for years to come. With effective assessment and treatment to regain strength and flexibility along with work to reduce movement anxiety and fear/avoidance behaviours around the neck and shoulder region, good progress towards return to full function can be made.

Anklylosing Spondylitis

AS is an inflammatory disease around the spine. It most commonly presents as ongoing stiffness around the lower back and neck region, particularly in the morning. In more advanced cases this inflammation can lead to new bone formation in the spine, causing sections of the spine to fuse in a fixed, immobile position. Early diagnosis is very important as recent developments in the medication combined with appropriate exercises can severely limit the progression of the disease and help with management.

For more information visit https://www.arthritis.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/4506_art_AS_newImages_4-0.pdf